Angelo Mangiarotti

Angelo Mangiarotti was one of the most important figures in the international design community during the 1960s. While he was known for being an adherent of strict design principles, he also sought to imbue his work with a sense of character and optimism.

Angelo Mangiarotti | COLLECTIONAL DUBAI

Angelo Mangiarotti stands apart from the other figures of the first generation of Italian design for his capacity to adapt the product to be designed to its function, its use and to the characteristics and conditions required by the material utilized.

Angelo Mangiarotti | COLLECTIONAL DUBAI

Mangiarotti and the development of his career embodies the evolution of modernism in the latter decades of the 20th century. After early experiments in plywood furniture and one-piece foam-core seating — including the 1110 lounge chair for Cassina —he began to design using more classic materials, from delicate, curvaceous blown-glass table lamps for Artemide to chandeliers with crystal links for Vistosi. Mangiarotti, in 1971, introduced what became his signature designs: a series of tables in marble and other stones that featured “gravity joints,” their legs held in place by the weight of the tabletop. Tables in his Eros collection (1971) have muscular proportions that anticipate the robust, overscale lines of postmodern works that would appear 10 years later: His Eccentrico table, for example, is a striking assemblage in marble featuring a top that is cantilevered dramatically on a canted columnar base.